Archive for February, 2013

Statuses

Bill Gowen’s 2013 Science Olympiad Glider

In Uncategorized on February 21, 2013 by nicholasandrewray

WIF-SO

Click here to download a PDF of the plan.

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Statuses

Ben Saks’ Float Is In Postproduction.

In Uncategorized on February 13, 2013 by nicholasandrewray

Ben Saks’ Float Is In Postproduction

The article below is copied from an update that went out to their backers on February 7th.

“We appreciate all of your continued support, and apologize for the long time we have taken to post this update. There has been a lot of speculation about what’s going on with Float. We hope this update will answer your questions.

KIT STATUS and BACKER REWARDS: Kits will start shipping in March, with the Ministick and Penny Plane Kits shipping first, followed by the F1D Kits. We will also be posting the video tutorials in March. These videos will be instructables focusing on how to properly build, trim and fly the planes. Please look for emails and messages asking for your shipping address. I will be sending these requests out in the next week. The non Kit rewards will be mailed or available upon the completion of the film.

FILM STATUS: After the successful completion of our fundraising efforts we carried out the final production tasks needed to complete the filming of Float. Our production team travelled from New York to England, Japan, Romania and Serbia in July and August 2012 to film on location and to cover the World Championships of F1D.

We have now collected over 8 terabytes of footage over the course of three years. This amount of footage is not easy to work with, however we have captured many great moments.  Filmed on location in Argentina, England, Japan, Serbia and Romania, Float will truly represent the international competition of F1D. We interviewed many of the most important individuals in the hobby, and captured the entire 2 year F1D World Championship cycle from start to finish.

Despite out best efforts we are unable to release the film as scheduled in February 2013, however we are on schedule to submit the film to festivals in September of 2013. We are working with a post production company to assist in the remaining professional services needed. This includes editing, sound design and music supervision, and voice-over narration.We will post continual updates about the status of the film throughout this post-production process. We will also be posting an updated trailer for the documentary. All of our efforts will focus on completing and releasing the film in 2013.

We honestly appreciate all of your continued support, and apologize for the long time we have taken to update our backers. Float is a passion project for us. We have come this far and are very close to getting this project finished. However we also have other real-life responsibilities which could not take a back seat over the last few months. With that being said, we are pushing full-steam-ahead to complete Float!

Here are some photos from our journey. This is just a taste of things to come!”

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Statuses

A Backup Battery For The Chain Gang Winder

In Uncategorized on February 12, 2013 by nicholasandrewray

A Backup Battery For The Chain Gang Winder

Ever since I started to use the Trumeter 7111 counter in the Chain Gang Winders, I’ve been bothered by the fact that the battery wasn’t replaceable. Using a new $40 counter every 8 or 10 years isn’t a problem in an industrial application, but this is a hobby. It’s not a problem for me personally, as I’m 77 now, and what are my chances of outlasting the battery? But for young kids like Finn and Kang, it’s a repetitive expense that isn’t fair. Even worse, the most recent customer is only 13, and given a normal lifespan, and if she stays in the hobby, she’s looking at an expense of better (worse?) than $250 over the years. This is unacceptable.

So, using what I had in the stash, I came up with a cheap, fast, sorta neat solution. You can do it too if you’re so inclined.
Here’s pics…
.015 x .250 from the K&S rack at the LHS. 6" lengths of servo wire, either Dubro as shown or Futaba, or whatever you have.

.015 x .250 from the K&S rack at the LHS. 6″ lengths of servo wire, either Dubro as shown or Futaba, or whatever you have.

Butter the bottom of the neg. strip with epoxy and feed it down under the cell using small nose pliers. Locate it along the diagonal edge of the PC board. Then slip a balsa wedge over the top of the cell to hold things together while the epoxy sets.

Butter the bottom of the neg. strip with epoxy and feed it down under the cell using small nose pliers. Locate it along the diagonal edge of the PC board. Then slip a balsa wedge over the top of the cell to hold things together while the epoxy sets.

Smear epoxy on top of the positive strip and slip it into place as shown.

Smear epoxy on top of the positive strip and slip it into place as shown.

Secure a CR2032 cell holder to the back of the aluminum bracket with 2-face tape and solder the leads on neatly. Sometime around 2020-2022 the original battery will die.

Secure a CR2032 cell holder to the back of the aluminum bracket with 2-face tape and solder the leads on neatly. Sometime around 2020-2022 the original battery will die.

 Go to the Dollar Store, get a new one, and you’re good for ten more years, cheap.
The winder in the picture is a very old aluminum one, having an .063 hook shaft with an .032 hook grafted on. There were a few like that.
Several years ago, I wrestled with a couple of Radio Shack cell holders on a different project and they were a nightmare. I eventually found the British made Harwin, which costs $1.70 against RS’s $1.20 one, but they’re not even from the same planet. I can supply a Harwin cell holder, 2 lengths of the brass strip and 2 lengths of nice soft servo wire for about $4 shipped domestic. If you’re interested in making the mod, and can’t get hold of any other holder than the RS, it might be a good idea to let me put this together for you.
Art Holtzman
GO CHAIN GANG !!!

Statuses

Folding F1D Wing Tips

In Uncategorized on February 1, 2013 by nicholasandrewray

Folding  F1D Wing tips

Whether you want to take along an extra wing or there is some question about your model box fitting into the overhead compartment of an airliner, here is a way to travel with a much shorter box. The wing tips are folded over so each wing will fit into a slot or box .7X8.5X15” or shorter depending on the length of the center panel. To use this system the dihedral joints are overlapped and it will be necessary to adjust the chord at those joints to comply with the 20 CM chord rule.

After the wing tips have been unfolded, the wing can be stored in one of those cardboard under the bed boxes. The box lies flat when disassembled and can easy be placed in with clothing or support gear and reassembled in a few minutes

When building the wing, overlap each tip spar at the dihedral joint (.075”) and glue it to the main spar with Aliphatic (carpenters glue) and glue the ribs in with Acetate glue. There’s no reason to worry about the film or rib coming loose near the dihedral breaks when using Aliphatic to glue the dihedral joints. After the wing is removed from the building board, make up four wire hinges using short pieces of .005 music wire bend at ninety degrees. (Four hinges weigh less than .006 g) Make a piercing tool using a .4” long piece of .005” music wire mounted in a small dowel and it’s best to sharpen the piercing end. Back up the spar with a pair of tweezers or hold the dihedral rib with your fingers. Take the tool and pierce a hole in the center of the joint and rotate the tool while pushing it through the spar, glue joint and into the dihedral rib. Insert the hinge and line up the end so that it is parallel with the spar.

.005mw hinge to prevent wing tip from separating from main spar

.005mw hinge to prevent wing tip from separating from main spar

Wing tip in the folded position

Wing tip in the folded position

After the wing is covered, lay out a small piece of plastic or waxed paper under each dihedral joint. Lay a small weight on the spars near the inside of each dihedral rib and one right in front of each dihedral joint and puddle two drops of water under each joint. Lift up each tip about 1/2” with a piece of balsa so that the tip outline will bow near the dihedral break. It will take several minutes for the glue to soften and it might be necessary to place a little extra water on the joints, but don’t flood them. Slowly lift the tip a little more to place added pressure to each joint. The tip outline could break at the dihedral joint if you get in a hurry. The glue will usually let go all at once and the wing tip can be folded over on the center panel. Leave the small weights in front of each dihedral joint until the aliphatic glue hardens to make sure the joint doesn’t open when the tips are folded over joint. The wire is placed at each joint to prevent this from happening but I leave them in place for added security. Place a little extra Aliphatic glue at each dihedral joint.  Reverse the procedure to fold the wing back to its original length.

L Coslick